When I'm doing my job, I'm getting things done.

When OSGi (or modularity in general) is doing it's job, it is preventing things from getting done. That's the job of OSGi, to prevent things from working except within very narrow contractual relationships.

Which is why OSGi deserves a slow and painful death. OK OK OK, that's only the way I feel when I get in these week long moods that stem from my inability to get all the metadata right, and I can't get my "modules" to run perfectly. Read more »

Dangerous Fred

Every big team has seen one or two of these guys. Dangerous Fred. Brilliant and stupid at the same time, breaks the wrong rules and still gets pretty amazing stuff done. But you don't want him touching your code.

How many meetings do I have to go to, to keep Fred off my project?

I think I've been Fred in decades past, at least once or twice. Sure have written a couple things I'm not so proud of, on the way to becoming a slightly better programmer. Read more »

This is a follow up to previous day's swooning, whining, and boot licking.

Ten years of "the desktop is dead, web-apps are the only way" makes a great corporate religion. If you're a true believer in this religion, read no further - I'm a non-believer. Requiring a web app should never mean I don't want a desktop - even more.

I want web apps and mobile web apps, sure. But I want the default as a desktop app that can shuffle as much of the computing to the local CPU as is reasonable.

And of course, I want to write the app one time. The platform should be super powerful and fully developed by others. It should update automagically, have superb installers, and a  phenomenal list of features, yada yada. An impossible dream. Read more »